Thursday, March 27, 2008

Earth Hour

Created to take a stand against the greatest threat our planet has ever faced, Earth Hour uses the simple action of turning off the lights for one hour to deliver a powerful message about the need for action on global warming.

About Earth Hour

On March 31 2007, for one hour, Sydney made a powerful statement about the greatest contributor to global warming – coal-fired electricity – by turning off its lights. Over 2.2 million Sydney residents and over 2,100 businesses switched off, leading to a 10.2% energy reduction across the city. What began as one city taking a stand against global warming caught the attention of the world.
In 2008, 24 global cities will participate in Earth Hour at 8pm on March 29. Earth Hour is the highlight of a major campaign to encourage businesses, communities and individuals to take the simple steps needed to cut their emissions on an ongoing basis. It is about simple changes that will collectively make a difference – from businesses turning off their lights when their offices are empty, to households turning off appliances rather than leaving them on standby.

To find out more jump onto www.earthhour.org above information taken from the earth hour website

Saturday, March 22, 2008

Car Jacking

Carjacking is when someone from the outside opens a door to your car and either attempts to steal something, remove you from the car and or steal the car whilst you are in it.
Carjacking often happens when you are stopped at a set of lights, pedestrian crossing or stop sign.

To minimise the possibility of being a carjack victim:


• Whilst driving, don’t leave your bag sitting on the front passenger seat with your wallet and mobile phone spilling out inviting trouble. Keep your doors locked and your car as tidy as you can.
• Be careful where you park your car. Do not park in side streets that are poorly lit, empty car parks or any area that makes you feel uncomfortable or unsafe.
• Do not sit in your parked car for prolonged periods of time. Park your car and get out quickly. When returning to your car, especially at night, get in quickly, lock the doors and be on your way as soon as you can.
• Do not open your window or door to any strangers asking questions. Carjackers will often try to build trust with you before they rob you.
• Enjoy driving, but don’t party in the car, even if you’re at a set of lights or stuck in traffic. Always ensure that all of your passengers are sitting in a designated passenger seat and don’t let passengers put their feet on the dash. It is important to not have any body parts hanging out of the window, or roof if you have a convertible/sunroof. The more distracted you are the more vulnerable you are to carjacking.

Tuesday, March 18, 2008

Going for a drive this Long Weekend?

Are you planning a long drive this weekend? Bags all packed, map marked and activities all planned. Have you remembered to do a quick safety check over your car?

1. Don’t forget to make sure your Galmatic Handbook is filled out correctly and in your glove box. Chapter 2 is all about your quick car check.

2. Check your tyre pressure and review the ‘how to change a tyre’ step by step guide on pages 22-23 of your handbook. If you don’t have a copy of the Galmatic Handbook, download these pages straight from the Galmatic website
www.galmatic.com/about.html

3. Fill your windscreen wiper fluid with water.

4. Check your oil (page 10 of Handbook), or check out our ‘Checking your Oil’ post.

5. Make sure the battery of your mobile phone is charged.

6. If you don’t have a First Aid Emergency Car Kit, pack a container with some bandaids, bandages, water, cotton buds, safety pins and antiseptic wipes, (all available from supermarkets or Chemists).

7. Make sure you have a street directory, maps of where you are going or if you have a Satellite Navigation double check that you have packed the car charger for it.

8. Have a fantastic drive, stay safe and remember to stop every 2 hours for a break.

Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Roundabouts - and how to use them!

I learn't to drive a long time ago, way before roundabouts became as popular as they are now. Because I run the Galmatic Car Care Workshops I need to keep up to date with new road rules, however what does the average driver do?
One of the tricky things to negotiate are roundabouts. The following information should help, especially if they weren't around when you started driving.

The roundabout sign means Slow Down, prepare to Give Way and if necessary stop to avoid a collision.

So, as you're approaching a roundabout, you must get into the correct lane, indicate if turning, and give way to traffic already on the roundabout.

Enter the roundabout when there is a safe gap in the traffic.
Giving way
Slow down as you approach a roundabout. You must give way to traffic already on the roundabout if there is a risk of collision. Enter the roundabout when there is a safe gap in the traffic.
Indicating

When approaching a roundabout, if you are turning left or right, you must indicate left or right.
When exiting a roundabout, whether you are turning left, right or even going straight ahead, you must always indicate a left turn just before you exit, unless it is not practical to do so.

Single lane roundabouts
The rules for slowing down, giving way and indicating when approaching and exiting at roundabouts are the same for single lane and multi-lane roundabouts.

Cyclists and roundabouts
At roundabouts with two or more marked lanes or lines of traffic, a cyclist has the option of turning right by entering the roundabout from either left or right lanes. However, if the cyclist chooses to enter from the left lane, the cyclist must take care to give way to any vehicle leaving the roundabout.


Going left
1. Slow down and prepare to give way as you approach the roundabout.
2. On approach you must be in the left lane unless otherwise marked on the road, and indicate a left turn.
3. You must give way to traffic already on the roundabout if there is any risk of a collision.
4. Enter the roundabout when there is a safe gap in the traffic.
5. Stay in the left lane.
6. Keep your left indicator on until you have exited the roundabout.
Going right
1. Slow down and prepare to give way as you approach the roundabout.
2. On approach you must be in the right lane unless otherwise marked on the road, and indicate a right turn.
3. You must give way to traffic already on the roundabout if there is any risk of a collision.
4. Enter the roundabout when there is a safe gap in the traffic.
5. Stay in the right lane.
6. You must indicate a left turn just before your exit unless it is not practical to do so.
Going straight ahead
1. Slow down and prepare to give way as you approach the roundabout.
2. On approach you can be in either lane, unless otherwise marked on road.
3. When going straight ahead you do not need to indicate on approach.
4. You must give way to traffic already on the roundabout if there is any risk of collision.
5. Enter the roundabout when there is a safe gap in the traffic.
6. You must indicate a left turn just before you exit unless it is not practical to do so.

Saturday, March 8, 2008

Our new Roadside Car Kit!

We have just added a great new product to the Galmatic range.
It is the perfect car kit for every girl to carry in her car to cover those little emergencies and urgencies that always seem to crop up!

As well as serious stuff, such as a thermal blanket, the kit contains deodorant, tampons, aromatherapy headache and stress remedy, lip conditioner, nail file, toothbrush and toothpaste, pencil, matches, breath mints and much more.

24 items packed in a gorgeous tin, perfect for those last minute sleep overs after too much champagne! http://www.galmatic.com/

Don't even think about crusin' around without one in your car.

Sunday, March 2, 2008

Blind Spots

What's a Blind spot?

One of the great things about driving an old car is that there are no sideview mirrors which means you definately look over your shoulder everytime!
Today I had a lady in a large SUV start to sway into my lane, oblivious to the fact that there was a car already there - me!
So ladies please be aware of the blind spot and don't just rely on using your mirrors.
The blind spot is the area of road and other vehicles that you can't see in any of your mirrors, which includes your revision mirror and your two sideview mirrors.
If you were the driver of the blue car, the light apricot colour is the area of vision that you would have from your side view mirrors. The darker shade of apricot is what you would see from the revision mirror.
Notice that part of the green car and almost the entire red car is out of vision range.
Minimise your blind spots by having your mirrors in the best position. When facing forward you should not see any of the side of your own car in your sideview mirrors.
Don't forget to check your mirrors every time you jump into your car, it only takes a minute!